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miércoles, 24 de agosto de 2016

'It's like Dante's Inferno': Horrific details emerge as rescuers hunt for 150 missing people buried under rubble after 6.2 magnitude earthquake rocks central Italy killing at least 73

Italy earthquake of magnitude 6.2 leaves at least 73 dead in town of Amatrice
At least 73 are dead and 150 people are missing after a powerful earthquake rocked Italy overnight. The 6.2-magnitude quake at around 3.30am local time was so powerful it was felt more than 100 miles away in the centre of Rome. Survivors today described 'apocalyptic' scenes in towns and villages near the city of Perugia - the capital of the tourist-packed Umbrian region, which is especially popular with British holidaymakers. The quake has devastated the mountainside towns and villages of Amatrice (pictured left and right), Accumoli, Arquata del Tronto and Pescara del Tronto. The mayor of Amatrice, Stefano Petrucci, said this morning: 'My town isn't here anymore' as pe

Shocking before and after pictures show how Italian towns have been completely destroyed by the devastating earthquake

  • Photographs from before and after the Italian earthquake show how hardest-hit areas have been ruined
  • The epicentre of was in Norcia, Umbria, and struck towns of Amatrice, Accumoli and Pescara del Tronto
  • Stefano Petrucci, mayor of Accumoli, said 'my town isn't here anymore' as he surveyed the devastation 
Photographs taken before and after the devastating earthquake in Italy this morning show how small towns and villages have been left in ruins.
Where once there were cobbled courtyards and terracotta-coloured buildings, now there are only piles of rubble and twisted metal.
Emergency service crews can be seen in some of the 'after' pictures as they rushed to rescue survivors from the debris. 
One 'before' picture taken in Amatrice shows the town's elegant clock tower, which has almost survived intact, but some of the houses nearby have disintegrated.
The square in the town features cobbled pavement, hanging flower baskets and a peach-coloured traditional building, but it's now utterly devastated.
The photographs show how some buildings in the towns suffered more than others. In one street in Arquata del Tronto, one building completely collapsed while the building next door only suffered damage to the facade.

A clock building was once a key feature in the town of Amatrice (top) it is now one of the only remaining structures in a once idyllic street (bottom)
A clock building was once a key feature in the town of Amatrice (top) it is now one of the only remaining structures in a once idyllic street (bottom)
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A clock building was once a key feature in the town of Amatrice it is now one of the only remaining structures in a once idyllic street
The neatly stacked pile of tires outside a garage in Accumoli (top) are now scattered across the road (bottom)
The neatly stacked pile of tires outside a garage in Accumoli (top) are now scattered across the road (bottom)
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The neatly stacked pile of tires outside a garage in Accumoli are now scattered across the road, while emergency services crews rushed to rescue trapped residents
A once quiet and picturesque street is seen with locals going about their daily lives (left) before the earthquake. On Wednesday the beautiful balcony of the building collapsed into a pile of rubble (right)
A once quiet and picturesque street is seen with locals going about their daily lives (left) before the earthquake. On Wednesday the beautiful balcony of the building collapsed into a pile of rubble (right)
 SLIDE ME 
A once quiet and picturesque street is seen with locals going about their daily lives before the earthquake. On Wednesday the beautiful balcony of the building collapsed into a pile of rubble.
A town square in Amatrice featuring cobbled pavement, hanging flower baskets and a peach coloured traditional Italian building (top) is now utterly devastated and left in ruins (below)
A town square in Amatrice featuring cobbled pavement, hanging flower baskets and a peach coloured traditional Italian building (top) is now utterly devastated and left in ruins (below)
 SLIDE ME 
A town square in Amatrice featuring cobbled pavement, hanging flower baskets and a peach coloured traditional Italian building is now utterly devastated and left in ruins
The same town square in Amatrice is seen here from a different angle. Above the building is intact but below half of it has crumbled to the ground  
The same town square in Amatrice is seen here from a different angle. Above the building is intact but below half of it has crumbled to the ground  
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The same town square in Amatrice is seen here from a different angle. Before the building is intact but after half of it has crumbled to the ground
A once delightful Italian street in Amatrice filled with terracotta-coloured buildings (left) now appears as a mass of grey rubble (right)
A once delightful Italian street in Amatrice filled with terracotta-coloured buildings (left) now appears as a mass of grey rubble (right)
 SLIDE ME 
A once delightful Italian street in Amatrice filled with terracotta-coloured buildings now appears as a mass of grey rubble
The shock waves of the earthquake last night tore through this large building in Accumoli, leaving a gaping space where most of the structure once stood
The shock waves of the earthquake last night tore through this large building in Accumoli, leaving a gaping space where most of the structure once stood
 SLIDE ME 
The shock waves of the earthquake last night tore through this large building in Accumoli, leaving a gaping space where most of the structure once stood
The photographs show how some buildings in the towns suffered more than others. In this street in Arquata del Tronto, one building completely collapsed while the building  next door only suffered damage to the facade
The photographs show how some buildings in the towns suffered more than others. In this street in Arquata del Tronto, one building completely collapsed while the building  next door only suffered damage to the facade
 SLIDE ME 
The photographs show how some buildings in the towns suffered more than others. In this street in Arquata del Tronto, one building completely collapsed while the building next door only suffered damage to the facade��
Emergency services initially struggled to reach all the affected areas because they are mostly small towns and villages spread out across the mountainous area. This building in Arquata del Tronto now has a gaping hole in one wall
Emergency services initially struggled to reach all the affected areas because they are mostly small towns and villages spread out across the mountainous area. This building in Arquata del Tronto now has a gaping hole in one wall
 SLIDE ME 
Emergency services initially struggled to reach all the affected areas because they are mostly small towns and villages spread out across the mountainous area. This building in��Arquata del Tronto now has a gaping hole in one wall
Strong tremors were felt in the capital Rome, more than 100 miles from the epicenter near the city of Perugia - the epicentre was between Norcia and Accumoli

Aerial views: Rescue teams search for Italy earthquake victims

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The powerful earthquake killed at least 38 people including two children, with many buried as they slept.
The 6.2-magnitude quake at around 3.30am local time was so powerful it rocked buildings in the centre of Rome more than 100 miles away and was felt across Italy.
Survivors have described 'apocalyptic' scenes in towns and villages near the city of Perugia - the capital of the tourist-packed Umbrian region, which is especially popular with British holidaymakers.
Swathed in blankets, a heavily wounded man gazes at his destroyed hometown of Amatrice which has been cut off from the world after its roads were buried in rubble 
Swathed in blankets, a heavily wounded man gazes at his destroyed hometown of Amatrice which has been cut off from the world after its roads were buried in rubble 
At least ten people have been killed after a 6.2-magnitude earthquake rocked central Italy (pictured, rescuers carry a man from the rubble in the town of Amatrice)
At least ten people have been killed after a 6.2-magnitude earthquake rocked central Italy (pictured, rescuers carry a man from the rubble in the town of Amatrice)
Shocking: A survivor in Amatrice is helped to safety after a powerful earthquake has rocked Italy overnight killing at least 38 people and burying many more as they slept
Shocking: A survivor in Amatrice is helped to safety after a powerful earthquake has rocked Italy overnight killing at least 38 people and burying many more as they slept
Collapsed: An unconscious survivor on a makeshift stretcher is carried from the what remains of a collapsed building in Amatrice
Collapsed: An unconscious survivor on a makeshift stretcher is carried from the what remains of a collapsed building in Amatrice
Aftermath: Residents of Amatrice in central Italy has been left in ruins overnight in an earthquake that shook areas up to 100 miles away, including Rome
Aftermath: Residents of Amatrice in central Italy has been left in ruins overnight in an earthquake that shook areas up to 100 miles away, including Rome
At least 38 are feared dead in the earthquake after people were crushed by falling buildings or suffocated by the rubble - rescuers have pulled out several from the ruins but can still hear voices from below.
Its epicentre was in Norcia in Umbria, about 105 miles north east of Rome, while the hardest-hit towns were reported as Amatrice, Accumoli and Pescara del Tronto. Falling bridges and landslides mean some areas are still cut off with emergency teams can only get there on foot.
The mayor of Accumoli, Stefano Petrucci, said this morning: 'My town isn't here anymore' as people were carried out of ruined buildings on stretchers and people desperately searched the debris for survivors or sobbed as they inspected their own ruined homes.
Photographer Emiliano Grillotti said that in Accumoli he saw over 15 people digging with their bare hands to save a family of four with two children, according to Repubblica. He said: 'I can hear one of the children screaming'.
The first victims of the devastating quake were an elderly couple whose home collapsed in Pescara del Tronto, in the Marche region, around ten miles from the epicentre. A family of four, including a eight-month-old baby and his brother, nine, were also reported dead in the town of Accumoli.
Huddled: A shocked woman and man are seen wrapped in blankets in front of collapsed houses in Amatrice, central Italy
Huddled: A shocked woman and man are seen wrapped in blankets in front of collapsed houses in Amatrice, central Italy
Bloodied: An injured nun checks her mobile phone as she lies near a ladder and a blanket following an earthquake in Amatrice
Bloodied: An injured nun checks her mobile phone as she lies near a ladder and a blanket following an earthquake in Amatrice
Agony: A man is pulled out of the rubble with a large gash in his head following the earthquake in Amatrice
Agony: A man is pulled out of the rubble with a large gash in his head following the earthquake in Amatrice
Survivor: A dust-covered man trapped in the rubble of his home as he slept is pulled from a hole by rescuers in Amatrice this morning
Two brothers, aged four and seven, were pulled from the rubble nearby after hiding under a bed with their grandmother as the building fell down. Some 100 people were still unaccounted for in the village of Arquata del Tronto. 
A newborn baby was also found dead after being pulled from a family home in the center of Arquata del Tronto. 
The quake hit during the summer when the populations of the towns and villages in the area, normally low during the rest of the year, are swelled by holidaymakers. 
One person has died and a family of four including two young children, aged 8 months and 9 years, are feared dead in their collapsed house in Accumoli, according to its mayor.
Stefano Petrucci said: 'Now that daylight has come, we see that the situation is even more dreadful than we feared, with buildings collapsed, people trapped under the rubble and no sound of life. 
'We have a tragedy here. Four people are under the rubble, but they are not showing any sign of life. Two parents and two children.
'It is a disaster, we have no light, no telephones, the rescue services have not got here yet.'  
The quake also destroyed homes and buried people under rubble in the small town of Amatrice, where many more are feared dead.
Debris: This is an overhead view of Amatrice, whose historic centre has been wiped out by the powerful earthquake overnight
Debris: This is an overhead view of Amatrice, whose historic centre has been wiped out by the powerful earthquake overnight
An aerial photograph from the Italian Fire Brigade shows the collapsed and damaged houses in Amatrice
An aerial photograph from the Italian Fire Brigade shows the collapsed and damaged houses in Amatrice
A video has emerged of a young girl covered in dust being carried to safety after she was pulled from the rubble in Amatrice
A video has emerged of a young girl covered in dust being carried to safety after she was pulled from the rubble in Amatrice
'The whole ceiling fell but did not hit me,' marveled resident Maria Gianni. 'I just managed to put a pillow on my head and I wasn't hit luckily, just slightly injured my leg.'
Another resident said she had been woken by the shaking in time to witness the wall of her bedroom cracking open. She was able to escape into the street with her children.
Nothing left: This shop's sign is hanging off and its walls are collapsed after the quake shook the area at around 3.30am
Nothing left: This shop's sign is hanging off and its walls are collapsed after the quake shook the area at around 3.30am
Tragic: Rescue workers and police officers carry a  victim out of the rubble inside a blanket in the village Amatrice 
Tragic: Rescue workers and police officers carry a victim out of the rubble inside a blanket in the village Amatrice 
Search: A sniffer dog is used to seek out any survivors under a collapsed building in Amatrice on Wednesday morning 
Search: A sniffer dog is used to seek out any survivors under a collapsed building in Amatrice on Wednesday morning 
Reaction: A dust-covered man cries with his head in his hands as the shock of what has happened overnight sinks in
Reaction: A dust-covered man cries with his head in his hands as the shock of what has happened overnight sinks in
Ruins: A lamppost is seen leaning dramatically to one side next to a devastated building and rescue workers 
Ruins: A lamppost is seen leaning dramatically to one side next to a devastated building and rescue workers 
Missing: The side of a traditional beige building is collapsed into grey rubble  in the town of Amatrice
Missing: The side of a traditional beige building is collapsed into grey rubble in the town of Amatrice

EUROPE'S DEADLIEST EARTHQUAKES AND WHY ITALY IS TORMENTED BY QUAKES 

The earthquake in Norcia occurred in a shallow fault in the Apennines, a chain of mountains that form the backbone of Italy’s ‘boot’. It is well known for being a highly complex and geologically active region as it sits at a point where several tectonic plates grind against each other.
According to the US Geological Survey, this morning’s earthquake occurred at a depth of 6.2 miles (10km) on a fault that runs from the northwest to the south east. The epicentre was in the mountains just 6.2 miles to the southeast of Norcia.
It was caused by the stretching of the Earth’s crust as the tectonic plates beneath moved apart. Since the late Miocene a large basin has been opening up under the western Mediterranean Sea at the point where the massive Eurasian tectonic plate meets the African plate.
Here the African plate is driven under the Eurasian plate in a process known as subduction. However, due to the forces involved, the bend in the African plate as it is forced beneath its neighbour can occasionally move backwards in a process known as ‘roll back’.
This map shows how fault lines run right up the spine of Italy and where the epicentre of Wednesday's earthquake was located 
This map shows how fault lines run right up the spine of Italy and where the epicentre of Wednesday's earthquake was located 
This map shows the location of the quake's epicentre and where activity has been measured
This map shows the location of the quake's epicentre and where activity has been measured
It is similar to the effect seen when bending a piece of paper towards one end and then moving your hands – this will cause the bend to roll from one side to the other. When this happens in the tectonic plates, however, the Eurasian plate remains stuck to the African plate and stretches in a process known as ‘back-arc spreading’. This is creating a region known as the Tyrrhenian basin under the sea between mainland Italy and Sardinia.
The earthquake in Norcia is thought to have been caused by the opening of the Tyrrhenian basin occurring faster than the compression between the Eurasian and African plates, causing the earth’s crust to stretch.
At the location of the earthquake, the Eurasian plate moves towards the northeast with respect to the African plate at a rate of around 24mm/yr, according to the US Geological Survey.
A build up in pressure at this junction was suddenly released this morning, creating the magnitude 6.2 earthquake.
Compared to other much larger earthquakes, such as the one off the coast of Japan in 2011 which was magnitude 9.0, it occurred at a much shallower depth.
The 2011 Japanese earthquake was more than 18.6 miles down while the one under the Apennines was just a third of that.
The shallow depth of the earthquake may account for the high levels of destruction seen in Norcia.
Unimaginable: An elderly man in a tracksuit walks on the rubble of a collapsed buildings in Amatrice. A television aerial can be seen alongside the bricks
Unimaginable: An elderly man in a tracksuit walks on the rubble of a collapsed buildings in Amatrice. A television aerial can be seen alongside the bricks
In 2016 a 7.0 earthquake at a depth of 6.2 miles (10km) in Kumamoto City in Japan killed 49 people, injured 3,000 and left much of the city in ruins.
There have been several earthquakes under the central Apennine region in recent years.  
In September 1997 there was a magnitude 6.0 earthquake 31 miles (50km) northwest of Norcia.
On that occasion 11 people were killed and 100 injured. Around 80,000 homes were destroyed in the Marche and Umbria regions.
In April 2009 a magnitude 6.3 earthquake occurred 28 miles (45km) to the south east of Norcia near the town of L’Aquila.
That killed at least 295 people and injured 1,000 while 55,000 people were left homeless.
Huge landslides occurred in the region and at least five aftershocks bigger than magnitude 5.0 rocked the area.
The largest recorded earthquake in the region, however, occurred 42 miles (68km) to the southwest near Avezzano in January 1915, when the area was rocked by a magnitude 6.7 shake. 
Europe is no stranger to deadly earthquakes. Here we list the most devastating:
28 December 1908 –Sicily and southern Italy. This magnitude 7.1 earthquake almost completely destroyed the Sicilian port city of Messina and Reggio Calabria in southern Italy. Between 75,000 and 200,000 people were killed although some estimates put the deathtoll at 95,000.
11 January 1693 – Sicily. The most powerful earthquake in Italian history, this magnitude 7.4 quake destroyed at last 70 towns and cities. It caused the death of around 60,000 people.
1 November 1755 – Lisbon, Portugal. Known as the Great Lisbon earthquake, it struck on the holiday day of All Saint’s Day at around 9.40am, sparking fires and a tsunami. Geologists have estimated it had a magnitude of between 8.5 and 9. Lisbon was almost totally destroyed and it is thought that a fifth of the city’s population perished. A further 10,000 are thought to have died in Morocco, bringing the deathtoll to an estimated 50,000.
26 December 1939 – Erzincan, Turkey. With a recorded magnitude of 7.8, this quake caused extensive damage around Erzincan and along the Kelkit River. Around 32,700 people died.
13 January 1915 – Abruzzi, central Italy. This magnitude 6.7 earthquake destroyed the town of Avezzano which sat directly over the epicentre. It left 32,000 people dead and caused $60 million of damage.
17 August 1999 – Turkey. More than 17,000 people were killed and 50,000 injured in this magnitude 7.6 earthquake. Nearly 37 seconds of strong shaking caused widespread damage in Istanbul, Izmit, Kocaeli and Sakarya. 
3 October 1914 – Burdur, Turkey. More than 17,000 houses were destroyed in this magnitude 7.0 earthquake and around 4,000 people lost their lives.
26 November 1943 – Ladik, Turkey. A magnitude 7.6 earthquake that caused the deaths of around 4,000 people and destroyed three quarters of the homes in the Ladik-Vezirkopru area.
1 February 1944 – Gerede, Turkey. About 50,000 homes were destroyed in this magnitude 6.5 earthquake and 2,790 people perished.
23 November 1980 – Campania and Basilicata, southern Italy. A magnitude 6.5 earthquake that claimed the lives of 2,735 people and left 394,000 people homeless.

One witness named Marco, a sanitation worker from Amatrice, told Repubblica how everything 'fell apart' in an instant.
'It was a miracle for me to survive... I just woke up when suddenly everything collapsed. Ten second were enough to destroy everything,' he said.
A witness in Configno, near Amatrice, recalled: 'It was a nightmare. We woke up at 3.35am, the furniture falling down, walls moving more than a meter. We rushed out, many are still in their underpants here, in the street. We did some bonfires in the square and went to help old people to get out from their houses.'
As daylight dawned, residents, civil protection workers and even priests began digging out with shovels, bulldozers and their bare hands, trying to reach survivors. There was a sigh of relief as a woman was pulled out alive from one building, followed by a dog.
'We need chain saws, shears to cut iron bars, and jacks to remove beams: everything, we need everything,' civil protection worker Andrea Gentili told The Associated Press.
'I don't know what to say. We are living this immense tragedy,' said the Rev. Savino D'Amelio, an Amatrice parish priest. 'We are only hoping there will be the least number of victims possible and that we all have the courage to move on.'
In Amatrice, the ANSA news agency reported two bodies had been pulled from one building. The Rev. Fabio Gammarota told ANSA another three were killed in a separate collapse.  
Residents and photographers stand next to damaged buildings after the strong heartquake hit Amatrice
Residents and photographers stand next to damaged buildings after the strong heartquake hit Amatrice
A man covered in a blanket walks in front of the rubble appears to walk in children's shoes after escaping the earthquake 
A man covered in a blanket walks in front of the rubble appears to walk in children's shoes after escaping the earthquake 
Search and rescue teams survey the rubble in Amatrice as a man walks over it with his phone in hand 
Search and rescue teams survey the rubble in Amatrice as a man walks over it with his phone in hand 
A mother embraces her terrified son in a blanket in Amatrice as they stand alongside other locals in the town 
A mother embraces her terrified son in a blanket in Amatrice as they stand alongside other locals in the town 
Amatrice Mayor Pirozzi told state-run RAI radio and Sky TG24 that residents were buried under collapsed buildings, that the lights had gone out and that heavy equipment was needed to clear streets clogged with debris.  
Aleandro Petrucci, the mayor of nearby Arquata del Tronto, said Pescara was one of 'two or three hamlets that have just completely disintegrated.' 
A resident of the village told Rai that she had been woken by the shaking in time to witness the wall of her bedroom cracking open. She was able to escape into the street with her children.
A family friend of a tourist from Toronto, Canada, who was caught up in the earthquake told MailOnline how he escaped.
Silvano Rendina was awoken and 'climbed through the window of his father's ancestral home in Pescara del Tronto when the earthquake struck'. After helping numerous townsfolk escape the rubble and after daybreak, he took photos of the utterly devastated town.
Mr Rendina eventually made it to a bar in neighbouring Tresungo, which had WiFi and bottled water for rescuers coming from Pescara del Tronto. 
'He said he thought they had got out all those who were verbally responsive, but reported that there were at least three other deaths other than the elderly couple reported. He said there had to be many more trapped,' family friend Mary Pat Elliott told MailOnline.
Two bodies were recovered from rubble in Amatrice, a mountain village in neighbouring Lazio that was packed with visitors at the peak of the summer season.
Paola Mancini, 79, told local newspaper Corriere the first words she heard were ‘run, run, everyone outside.’
She was in the hospital Grifoni, in Amatrice, when the earthquake started. A nurse screamed for everyone to get out into the street.
She said: ‘There were two of us in the emergency room. We got up and ran as quickly as possible. We were in the hall, where we found a doctor who calmed us as much as he could.'
She was admitted into the hospital on Tuesday. This morning she was in the street along with the rest of the 14 inhabitants of the hospital.
Many buildings in center of Amatrice were razed by the 6.1 magnitude quake, which struck at around 3.30am (local time)
Many buildings in center of Amatrice were razed by the 6.1 magnitude quake, which struck at around 3.30am (local time)
'There are people under the rubble... There's been a landslide and a bridge might collapse,' said the mayor of Amatrice (pictured)
'e: 1.2em;">Toby Shaw, from Hampshire, tweeted: 'I'm really hoping that I've just experienced an earthquake in Rome, otherwise I'm not sure I want to know what it was that shook the room.'    

THE EARTHQUAKE HIT SOME OF ITALY’S MOST BEAUTIFUL AREAS 

The earthquake struck in the regions of Umbria, Marche and Lazio.
Umbria – sometimes called the ‘Green Heart of Italy’ - is known for its truffles, wine, abbeys, art, monuments and beautiful forests.
It’s also home to the tallest man-made waterfall in Italy - the 272ft Roman-built Cascata delle Marmore – and Lake Trasimeno.
It’s sometimes touted as ‘the new Tuscany’ and is extremely popular with tourists.
Marche, which borders the Adriatic Sea, is quieter than Umbria and is famous for its beautiful beaches, coves and cliffs – and twisty roads across its hilly heart.
It’s popular not only as a seaside destination, but for driving and hiking trips.
Lazio is the Italian region that surrounds Rome and is far less known to British visitors than the likes of Tuscany and Umbria.
Amatrice, in Lazio, which has been badly hit by the earthquake, is famous in Italy as a beauty spot and is a popular holiday destination for Romans seeking cool mountain air at the height of the summer. 

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