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domingo, 15 de mayo de 2016

Coroner's inquest system is broken, say advocates


A Star analysis finds recommendations for preventing future deaths are often repeated from one inquest to the next, to little effect.
Carrie and Neika Pryce, whose mentally ill brother, Ian Pryce, was killed by police during a confrontation in 2013, found the inquest that eventually followed was unlikely to produce meaningful change in how police deal with people in crisis.
Carrie and Neika Pryce, whose mentally ill brother, Ian Pryce, was killed by police during a confrontation in 2013, found the inquest that eventually followed was unlikely to produce meaningful change in how police deal with people in crisis.  (GEOFF ROBINS / Toronto Star) | Order this photo  
Carrie Pryce mourned her brother Ian Pryce three times.
The first time was when she learned he had been shot and killed by members of the Toronto Police Service. The second time was when the Special Investigation Unit cleared both the officers of any wrongdoing.
The third time was slower, and took place during the coroner’s inquest into Ian’s death.
“I had a sense a few days into the inquest that there was not going to be any change,” Pryce said.
Coroners’ inquests are called to do two main things: figure out how and why a person died, and whether anything can be done to prevent similar deaths in the future.
But whether these inquests effect any actual change is still in question.
A Toronto Star analysis of coroner’s inquests of police-involved shootings shows the recommendations in the Pryce inquest have been made before — often more than once, some as far back as 15 years ago.
Sometimes, the recommendations get responses from the organizations they’re addressed to. But even then, they reappear in subsequent inquests, raising questions as to whether anything really changes after a coroner’s inquest makes a recommendation.
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